Chemical Peels 101!

Chemical peels

When you hear the word chemical peel, usually what springs to mind are horrifying images of red blotchy, blistered, maybe even bloody, skin.  However, not all peels are created equal.  Enzyme peels can offer a more gentle form of exfoliation while a TCA peel can penetrate into the deeper layers of skin.

Here’s an overview on what you need to know about chemical peels.

Chemical Peels Defined

A chemical peel  is an accelerated form of exfoliation that involves an injury of a specific skin-depth.  It involves a process of removing excess accumulations of dead skin cells from the skin through acids, retinoids or enzymes.

Types of Chemical Peels 

  • Very superficial/superficial- performed by estheticians and used for fine wrinkles, sun damage, acne and some cases of rosacea
  • Medium Depth- performed by doctors or estheticians under medical supervision and used for more obvious wrinkles, sun damage and precancerous lesions like actinic keratosis
  • Deep- performed only be a pysician, this peel is used for severe wrinking and sun damage and healing can take several weeks

Benefits of Chemical Peels

  • Improves texture of the skin- looks and feels smoother
  • Reduced fine lines and wrinkles
  • Can potentially stimulate collagen and elastin production
  • Can improve skin conditions such as acne, acne scars, hyperpigmentation, sun damaged and dry skin
  • Increased moisture retention

 Contraindications for a Chemical Peel 

Although a chemical peel is a great treatment, not everyone is a candidate for them.  Being honest with your esthetician or medical professional will significantly reduce adverse reactions. The following list details some reasons that can contraindicate a chemical peel treatment:

  • Recent cosmetic surgeries, waxing, laser resurfacing, other chemical peels or dermabrasion
  • Recent fillers or Botox
  • Use of Retina-A, retinol, Accutane (Isotretinoin), or other medications that exfoliate or thin the skin
  • Allergies to the ingredients/aspirins
  • Pregnancy
  • Herpes simplex
  • Infectious diseases
  • Open sores or lesions
  • Sunburned or irritated skin
  • Medications that make the skin sensitive to the sun

Post Chemical Peel Care

Once your procedure is completed, follow your esthetician’s or medical professional’s advice on how to care for your skin.  Key points to remember are:

  • Avoid direct sunlight for 48 hours and wear SPF as your skin will be extra sensitive to the sun.   Physical sunscreen is best for sensitive skin.
  • Stay cool and avoid hot tubs, saunas, steam rooms, hair dryers or any activity that can generate heat for about 2 days as heat can cause hyperpigmentation.
  • Whether you peel or not doesn’t determine if the peel “worked”.
  • Do not pick or pull on loosening or peeling skin.  You can lightly exfoliate with a dry towel if flaking occurs.
  • Do not wax for 72 hours after a treatment or immediately before.
  • Use gentle products for a few days after the treatment and avoid anything with active ingredients such as retinol.

Before you opt to receive a chemical peel, consult with your esthetician or medical professional to discuss your goals and concerns see what options are right for you.  Also, be mindful of the fact that it may take more than one treatment to see results so make sure that you are financially prepared.

I hope this post was helpful and if you have any other questions, let me know!

Have you ever received a chemical peel?  What was your experience like? 

Stephanie

A Beauty-Full Day!

ICES

I hope everyone had a great weekend!  Mine was pretty eventful as I attended The International Congress of Esthetics and Spa in Long Beach! It’s an event held  for professionals in the skin care, beauty and wellness industry where you can attend workshops, advanced education seminars and purchase products.  Translation: heaven for a beauty junkie like me!  Here’s a small recap of my day.

 

Badge

The badge we receive for the day of the event- very nice.

Skin Script

First purchase was at the Skin Script booth.  I got the Pomegranate Antioxidant Cleanser, 15% Vitamin C/Green Tea Serum, and the Ageless Skin Moisturizer, with Aloe and Co-Q10.  

SS Peels

 

Another Skin Script purchase.  This one is their holiday special Spiced Cider Facial which includes the Apple Orchard Enzyme and Autumn Spice Hydrating Mask.  Unlike the Skin Script items above though, you need a license to purchase these.

Ilike

I stopped by the Ilike booth which has  an ‘organic’ line of products.  After speaking to one of the representatives, I bought the Sour Cherry Gel Mask for my combination skin.  *Note: I put organic in quotes because there isn’t a universal standard on what is deemed organic.

EM

The Eminence booth was crowded all the time and filled with on-going demonstrations but I managed to squeeze in to scope out their ‘organic’ line. I ended up getting the Strawberry Rhubarb Dermafoliant (an exfoliator that seems similar to Dermalogica’s Daily Microfoliant) and Strawberry Rhubarb Masque with Hyaluronic Acid, again a mask for my combination skin.

Brands

Though I received a ton of informational pamphlets and brochures from other exhibitors there, I’m highly interested in checking out these products in the future: (h2t) for their pumpkin peel (it smells AMAZING and will hopefully be ordering it soon), Circadia by Dr. Pugliese, Dermapen, Rhonda Allison and Image Skincare.

Mags

Always great to receive free trade industry magazines!

By the end of the day I was exhausted! It’s a bit overwhelming to be surrounded by soo many different products, demonstrations, information, devices, samples (not pictured here) and people.  I concluded my day with a seminar on the Hydrafacial- a modified version of microdermabrasion- and a facial with an (h2t) 30% pumpkin peel.  Pure bliss.

I will post reviews on the products once I have an opportunity to try them out!  What conventions do you look forward to? IMATS? The Makeup Show? Other?  I’d love to know! 

 

 

A Day at IDI!

IDI 1

During my free time, I love learning more about the skincare industry, whether it’s through reading articles or attending advanced education classes.  Yesterday, I spent my day at the International Dermal Institute (IDI) which serves as a post-graduate education center for licensed estheticians to expand their knowledge in this constant evolving industry.  IDI is also where the ingredient research and product development of the Dermalogica skin care line happens.

I absolutely love spending time here! The staff and instructors are very helpful and knowledgeable, and highly respected industry professionals like Dr. Diana Howard and Annet King can be seen giving speeches or sitting in on some classes.  This time I took Skin Analysis 101 which covered what comprises an effective skin analysis, the importance of consultation cards (imperative whenever you get treatments!), a brief overview on understanding how the skin works, skin types vs skin conditions and skin disorders.  After the theory portion concluded came the fun part: hands on!

We all got to analyze each other’s skin using a magnifying lamp, a Woods lamp, and a skin scanner.

The magnifying lamp magnifies the face to help the esthetician treat and analyze the skin.

Mag Lamp

The Wood’s lamp is a hand-held device that uses filtered black light to illuminate skin problems, fungi, bacterial disorders and pigmentation issues.

Wood's Lamp

The skin scanner is like a Wood’s lamp in that it utilizes advanced black-light technology to help identify various skin conditions in vivid florescent colors; however, this machine is a lot bigger and both the esthetician and the client can see how their skin appears under the black light.  There’s something pretty cool (and scary!) about seeing your skin in an up close way that is not ordinarily visible to the naked eye.

Skin Scanner

Once we finished analyzing each other’s skin, we did a quick recap of what we learned and were given our certificates of completion.  I earned 6 class hours for today’s class, giving me an overall total of 33 hours at IDI!  I am 67 hours away from completing 100 hours and earning an IDI Certificate of Achievement.

IDI 2

What’s your favorite thing to do when you have free time?