Skin Tip: Dark Chocolate for Healthier Skin!

Calling all chocolate lovers!

Did you know that consuming 1 ounce of dark chocolate with at least 60% cocoa contains high levels of flavonoids, an antioxidant which can protect against sun damage and reduce roughness in skin? Now you know. ūüôā

Have a lovely weekend readers! 

Stephanie 

Skin Tip: Ingredient Lists and Antioxidants!

It’s Friday readers and that means my weekly skin tip! ūüôā

Those of you that have been following my blog for a while now know that I am a huge advocate for antioxidants in skincare ingredients, especially vitamin C. ¬†However, if you happen to read the label and see that the antioxidants are listed towards the bottom of the list, chances are they were added to preserve the product and not intended to be active ingredients. ¬†Sometimes, this could be the reason why a certain product that claims to ‘fade spots’ or ‘help brighten your look’ isn’t as effective as you would like it to be. For a guide on how to decipher other names for antioxidants vitamin A, vitamin C and vitamin E, click on each link.

Have a great weekend everyone and don’t forget to check out my giveaway by clicking here. ūüôā

Stephanie 

The Beauty in Sleep!

sleeping beauty

What’s one thing college students, new parents, teenagers and more than half of the American population have in common?

Sleep deprivation.

As important as it is to get enough sleep, a study conducted by the National Sleep Foundation in 2002 concluded that ‚Äú74% of American adults experience a sleeping problem a few nights a week or more and 39% get less than seven hours of sleep each weeknight.‚ÄĚ ¬†Recently, The American Academy of Pediatrics issued a statement suggesting an 8:30 a.m. or later school start time for middle and high school students and with good reason.

Research has shown that young people who don’t get enough sleep are more likely to suffer depression, be involved in car accidents and have lower test scores. ¬† Lack of sleep is also a risk factor for weight gain and can disrupt the body‚Äôs regulation of blood sugar. ¬†An increase in stress-hormone levels contribute to an elevated rise in blood pressure and promote inflammatory changes associated with chronic disease, including heart disease and diabetes.

Much More Than Just A Phrase

We’ve all heard about needing our ‘beauty sleep’ but it turns out this phrase isn’t just superficial-it can accelerate the aging process! ¬†On a visual level, not receiving the crucial shut-eye results in a dull complexion because when you are tired, blood doesn‚Äôt flow efficiently; fine lines also appear more prominent. ¬†On a deeper level, your skin, as well as your whole body, transitions into repair mode when you sleep.¬† New skin cells grow and replace older cells. ¬†An increase in inflammatory cells in the body lead to a breakdown in collagen and hyaluronic acid, both of which assist in giving skin it‚Äôs glow, bounce and translucency.

A Look at ‚ÄėBeauty Sleep‚Äô by the Hour

Perhaps Charles Perrault‚Äôs tale The Sleeping Beauty in the Woods was inadvertently on to something, except let’s replace the 100 years with the recommended 7-9 hours of sleep per night. (Yet another example of how I love to tie beauty and literature together!)

Hours 1-3: The deepest sleep of the night, your body produces the most human growth hormone- critical to skin and hair repair.

Hours 4-5: Deep sleep shortens and rapid eye movement (REM) sleep begins. There’s also an increase in melatonin, a hormone with potent antioxidant properties to combat oxidative stress.

Hours 6-8: This is when you get the most REM sleep. Your skin’s temperature reaches its lowest point, enabling muscles to relax and allowing skin its deepest recovery.

Solutions to Promote Better Sleep

Sometimes sleep doesn’t come easily so if you have trouble sleeping, try these suggestions.

  • Schedule your bedtime and your wake-up time according to the number of hours of sleep you need.
  • About an hour or more before bedtime, stop phone calls and watching television and read or listen to music instead.
  • Try aromatherapy (my favorite!).¬† Lavender, neroli and sandalwood essential oils can relax and promote a restful sleep.¬† Fill half of a mini spray bottle with water, mix in your relaxing essential oil of choice and lightly spritz onto your sheets and/or pillow.
  • Learning to manage your stress or keep it under control will in turn yield to a more restful sleep. Breathing techniques, exercise, a spa visit and regular massages can keep stress in check.

Hope you all had a lovely weekend. What helps you catch more Zzzzz’s?¬†

 

Disclaimer: The contents on this website, and any related links, are provided for general informational purposes and should NOT be considered medical advice. The content is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Never disregard professional medical advice or delay in seeking it because of something you have read here. Please consult a healthcare provider if you have any questions about a particular health condition. 

 

 

Beauty Benefits of Tamarind Water!

tamarind

Since healthy skin works from the inside out, here’s another idea inspired by drinks I grew up with that are great for beating the summer heat: tamarind water, also known as agua de tamarindo! ¬†

Tamarind is a sweet and sour fruit that is rich in tartaric acid, which is a powerful antioxidant and a good source of iron, thiamin, niacin and vitamin C. ¬†Antioxidants can help protect your skin from the sun’s damaging rays, guarding your cells from damage and vitamin C helps the body repair itself. ¬†Tamarind can be found in any market that appeals to Hispanic, Asian and Indian cultures. ¬†To make tamarind water, follow below.

10-15 tamarind pods

Water (about 10 cups)

Sweetener of choice

1) Take the tamarind pods and remove the outer shell and any veins (strings) that may be attached.  Discard the shells and veins.

2) Place the inner portion of the tamarind (looks like seeds) inside a pot and boil for about 25-30 minutes.

3)  After 25-30 minutes, remove from stove and let it cool down completely.

4) Once the tamarind water has cooled down, squeeze the remaining pulp from the seeds with clean hands and discard the seeds.

5) Next,  blend the water and pulp in a blender and pour into a pitcher after running it through a sieve.

6) Lightly sweeten to taste (emphasis on the lightly!) and enjoy!  You can always add a bit more water to dilute some of the tartness without having to add tons of sugar.

Hope you enjoyed this post! 

 

Beauty And The Oils

Oils have been around since…well, forever but recently the beauty industry has seen their resurgence. ¬†It almost seems like there is a new ‘beauty’ oil discovered every week, each superseding the one before. ¬†From kitchen pantry and health food stores to the beauty aisle, the following oils are lauded as¬†the¬†ultimate ingredient for your face, body, hair and/or nails.

Argan-Oils

Argan  (Argania Spinosa Kernel Oil)

Pressed from nuts found in argan trees-exclusive only in Morroco- argan oil is rich in polyunsaturated fatty acids including linoleic acid, omega-6, which helps in maintaining the lipid barrier in skin and natural tocopherols (vitamin E).  It nourishes, regenerates and protects the skin.

In hair, it adds moisture to dry hair, calms frizzy ends and can help with a dry scalp.

coconut_oil

Coconut (Cocos Nucifera  (Coconut) Oil)

A staple in tropical regions of the world, coconut oil moisturizes, strengthens connective tissues, provides antibacterial properties through lauric acid, nourishes and heals. ¬†I think it’s important to note that although coconut oil has anti-bacterial properties and some people claim it’s a great treatment for acne, use caution. ¬†Those who suffer from acne may find it feels too heavy, clogging pores and potentially leading to more breakouts.

In regards to hair, coconut oil can penetrate better than other oils and therefore is commonly used as a deep conditioner (or found in conditioning products).

grapeseed

Grapeseed (Vitis Vinifera (Grape) Seed Oil)

Extracted from the seeds of grapes, this is rich in linoleic acid and acts as an emollient and antioxidant (high in vitamin E). ¬†Linoleic acid is an unsaturated EFA that is found in skin lipids like ceramides and cholesterol which protects the skin barrier function, prevents the drying of ¬†skin and soothes. ¬†It’s ideal for massage oil since it glides well on skin.

jojoba oil

Jojoba (Simmondsia Chinensis (Jojoba) Seed Oil)

From the  jojoba plant and known for resembling sebum (oil found on your face), jojoba oil moisturizes, reconditions the skin and provides barrier potection. Interestingly, jojoba oil is thought to balance oil production which could be great news for people with oily skin.  The tocopherol content provides excellent antioxidant activity. *Note: Sometimes only small amounts are needed to reap the benefits so tread lightly if you apply the oil straight to your face.  It might be best for those with oily skin to look for skincare products formulated with this ingredient instead.

OLIVEOIL

Olive (Olea Europaea (Olive) Fruit Oil)

Olive oil is rich in vitamin E and antioxidants which help repair and renew skin from oxidative stress, soothes inflammation, smoothes the skin and helps maintain skin elasticity.

In hair, olive oil doubles both as a deep conditioner and dandruff controller, and when rubbed on nails, it helps cuticles stay plump and hydrated while producing a natural shine.

sunflower

Sunflower (Helianthus Annuus (Sunflower) Seed Oil)

Produced from sunflower seeds, sunflower oil replenishes and restores the skin with nourishing fatty and amino acids.  Amino acids supply nutrients to nourish the skin, which in turn strengthens connective tissue and keeps the skin smooth.  Sunflower oil also increases moisture retention (great for dry skin!) and provides natural barrier protection.

 

sweet almond

Sweet Almond Oil (Prunus Amygdalus Dulcis (Sweet Almond) Oil)

This oil contains high levels of oleic acid and unsaturated triglycerides provide moisture to skin that is easily absorbed into the skin. Oleic acid, found naturally in vegetable and animal oils, is high in unsaturated omega-9 fatty acids, providing emolliency and a soothing factor to skin.

In hair, it adds shine and purportedly controls hair fall.

 

Bottom Line:¬†Although the benefits of these oils are superb, it may not work the same for everyone. ¬†You may find that some oils dry out your hair instead of ¬†smoothing them or they work wonders for your body but can wreck havoc on your face. ¬†‘Natural’ can be great but isn’t exempt from producing adverse reactions so use with caution.

Have you tried any of these oils?  What was your experience like? 

Sephora Sun Safety Kit Review

Sephora Sun Kit

Sephora Sun Safety Kit, $32

Last week, Sephora released their annual Sun Safety Kit and I believe it is perfect timing since May is Skin Cancer Awareness month.  Since 90% of skin cancer is caused by the sun, I love that this kit provides an array of sunscreens you can try out.  This year, they included a lot more self-tan/bronzing products, which in my opinion is okay, but I would personally prefer more sunscreens.   All products are great for traveling and you can toss them in your purse, making it easier to reapply.  $20 of the proceeds go towards the Skin Cancer Foundation. Here is the breakdown of the kit, along with my thoughts and/or experience.

Sunscreens 

Algenist Regenerative Anti-Aging Moisturizer SPF 20

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This is both a moisturizer and sunscreen, which is great if you want to cut down your morning/afternoon skincare routine time.  I find it has a slight medicinal-sunscreen like fragrance that while not overpowering, is prominent.  However, the scent does not linger after it is applied.  It feels a bit thick but it absorbed quickly into my skin and so far, has not broken me out.  Ingredients like enantia chlorantha bark extract and biotin can help control oil and it does contain a bit of vitamin C. *Note: No synthetic fragrances are added.

 

Bare Minerals ready Touch Up Veil Broad Spectrum SPF 15 in Translucent 

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I really like that they included a pressed powdered sunscreen instead of the loose powdered one. ¬†Definitely not as messy. ¬†I also love that this is an easy way to reapply SPF, especially if you are wearing makeup. ¬†It also can work to keep shine at bay for those with oilier skin. ¬†It’s also formulated with antioxidants like green tea, vitamin C, vitamin E, and grapeseed oil.

 

Clarins UV Plus HP Ecran Multi-Protection Broad Spectrum SPF 40 Titanium Dioxide 

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This is a 100% mineral based sunscreen (titanium dioxide). ¬†Personally, this is not my favorite as it leaves behind a white cast on my face and feels like a heavy sunscreen. ¬†I do keep this in my purse though and apply to my hands while driving to keep them protected. ¬†It does contain two notable antioxidants, green tea and vitamin E. ¬†However, I also see that alcohol is listed as an ingredient but it doesn’t state which kind so it may be irritating to some.

Ole Henrikson Protect The Truth SPF 50+

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I don’t particularly love this sunscreen but I don’t hate it either. ¬†The consistency is light-weight but it leaves behind a little bit of a white cast effect too. ¬†It’s easily covered when you apply your foundation on top though, works fairly well under makeup and it contains vitamins A, C, and E, which are excellent antioxidants. ¬†Another downside: There is a minute amount of fragrance added but it appears¬†last on the ingredient list.

Origins A Perfect World SPF 25 Age Defense Moisturizer with White Tea 

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Another time saver in the morning as it is both a moisturizer and sunscreen. ¬†The scent is kind of herbal and citrus like and it does tend to linger a bit. ¬†The texture is lightweight and it is oil-free. ¬†The addition of ¬†white tea and resveratrol are great antioxidants and can strengthen the efficacy of the sunscreen. ¬†Unfortunately, I couldn’t find a complete list of the ingredients online, so I can’t tell if it has any added fragrance. ¬†Bottom line: It’s good but not my favorite.

Peter Thomas Roth Max Sheer All Day Moisture Defense Lotion Sunscreen Lotion

IMG_20140518_132049_185-1

This sunscreen definitely smells like a traditional sunscreen and it does feel a bit heavier. ¬†While it didn’t make me break out, it tended to make my skin feel a bit more oily. ¬†*Note: It is a chemical sunscreen, so if you are sensitive to chemical sunscreens and are looking for a physical sunscreen (zinc oxide/titanium dioxide), you may want to skip this one. ¬†Noteworthy ingredients: Vitamins A,C and E, allantoin (a calming and soothing ingredient) and panthenol (pro vitamin B5 which is an humectant).

Shiseido Ultimate Sun Protection Cream+ Broad Spectrum SPF 50+ 

IMG_20140518_132714_790-1

Since the texture of this sunscreen is heavier, hence the cream factor, I think those who have a dry skin type would benefit from this. ¬†What is great about this sunscreen is that it has the Skin Cancer Foundation Seal Of Recommendation for those who are active. ¬†This means it “should protect the wearer from extended sun exposure, such as exposure received outdoors during recreational activities.” ¬†It has also been found to include a water resistance factor, although as with any sunscreen, you must reapply¬†every two hours or so, especially when outside.

Sunscreen Oil

Supergoop Sun-Defying Sunscreen Oil with Meadowfoam Broad Spectrum SPF 50 

IMG_20140518_131323_391-1

 

I have not tried this one as I glanced through the ingredients and it contains coconut oil.  Although coconut oil may work for some, it makes me breakout when I use it on my face.  I feel this would really make me breakout and I would have to do more research on sunscreen oils.  Not entirely convinced on this idea yet. It is also a chemical sunscreen and lists tocotrienols (members of the vitamin E family), argan oil, grapeseed oil and shea butter among other ingredients.

Lip SPF

Fresh Sugar Lip Treatment Sunscreen SPF 15

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I am glad that the kit this year included a lip product with SPF as sometimes we (yes, even me!) tend to forget about protecting our lips.  Fresh Sugar lip balms in general are pretty moisturizing but fee light-weight.  This particular one has a lemon scent, which is pretty perfect for summer.

Oil Control with SPF

Murad Oil-Control Mattifier SPF 15 

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I think this mattifier would work great on oily skin. ¬†It contains cinnamomum zeylanicum bark extract, which is excellent for treating acne; biotin and niacinamide, great for controlling oil production; and¬†antioxidant vitamin E. ¬†My skin isn’t too oily yet, but I will keep this around and see how it works.¬†

Bronzers

Dr. Denis Gross Alpha Beta Glow Pad Anti-Aging Exfoliating Self-Tanner with Active Vitamin D and Dr. Dennis Gross Alpha Beta Daily Glow Moisture 

IMG_20140518_131812_806-1

I haven’t had luck with self-tanner towelettes and this was no exception. ¬†In theory, this would be great because you receive exfoliation benefits as well as a nice tan. ¬†However, ¬†until I get the hang of how to use these, I will pass because they tend to streak and some areas are darker than others.

St. Tropez Self-Tan Bronzing Mousse 

IMG_20140518_132810_773-1

Of all the self-tanning products in this kit, I like this one the best. ¬†It’s a dark-colored foam that is easy to apply and you can actually see where you are applying it. ¬†I think this would work best on those who are fair-skinned. ¬†The color looked the most natural on me but I am still working on learning how to apply it evenly.

 

Stila All Day10-in-1 HD Bronzing Beauty Balm Broad Spectrum SPF 30

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This is a BB cream with a bronze tint. ¬†While I wouldn’t use it by itself, I may mix it in with my normal CC cream to add a hint of color. ¬†It comes in a ‘universal’ shade, which by my experience won’t work on everyone. ¬†Fragrance is listed rather high on the ingredient list so beware if you are sensitive to it.

Tarte Brazilliance Self Rejuvenating Maracuja Self Tanner 

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Sadly, this didn’t work out for me. ¬†True to their claim, this did not turn orange, but on me, it looked muddy. ¬†Definitely not natural. ¬†I know the full size comes with a mitt so maybe that might make a difference. ¬†This does contain vitamins A,C, and E but is also lists fragrance towards the top of the ingredient list.

Too Faced Chocolate Soleil Medium/Deep Matte Bronzer

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Love this bronzer.  It is a matte finish (perfect for my skin since it tends to get oilier in the summer), great for contouring or adding a hint of color, is travel sized and has a mirror attached on the inside.

You can purchase the kit at Sephora stores or you can ask for samples to try them out.  I hope this review was helpful!

Sunscreen 101!

Sunscreen 2

Different seasons bring a host of new trends in the beauty industry- think pastel washes of color, orange lipstick, the coveted au naturale look- but what’s one trend we should implement and follow all year-round?

Sunscreen!

Whether you are male or female, have a skincare regimen in place or not, sunscreen should be a staple product in your arsenal.  The immense danger of exposure to UV radiation is skin cancer, however skin cancer is almost entirely preventable if you choose the right sunscreen and apply with slavish devotion.  The sun is also a main culprit in the causes of wrinkles, hyperpigmentation and saggy skin-even going out for a quick walk or running an errand in your car exposes you to the sun’s damaging rays!

While there is a plethora of sunscreens to choose from, you don’t have to spend a fortune to protect yourself.  Here is a brief insight into sunscreen.

Broad-spectrum

Make sure that your sunscreen offers broad-spectrum coverage, which will protect you from UVA and UVB rays.  UVA rays cause premature aging and UVB rays are known as the tanning and burning rays; both cause cancer.

Sun Protection Factor

The term ‚ÄúSPF‚ÄĚ is the abbreviation for a product‚Äôs Sun Protection Factor.¬† The level of protection is not proportionate with SPF rating, meaning a higher SPF doesn‚Äôt mean more protection.¬† In fact, an SPF of 15 provides protection from 93% of the sun‚Äôs rays, SPF 30 protects from 97% of the sun‚Äôs rays and an SPF 60 protects 98%. ¬†No sunscreen can block 100% of the sun‚Äôs rays and it is important to reapply every 2 hours during outdoor activities, sweating or swimming.

Types: Physical and Chemical

Physical sunscreens sit on the surface of the skin and reflect or scatter UV radiation before it can reach the epidermis. Zinc oxide and titanium dioxide compose this category.

Zinc oxide is a great option for those who have sensitive skin or rosacea.

Chemical sunscreens have a strong ability to effectively absorb UVB radiation before they can damage the skin. Look for:  Octisalate, Oxybenzone, Homosalate, Octyldimethly PABA (Padimate O), Octocrylene, Octinoxate, Avobenzone (Parasol 1789), and/or Ecamsule (Mexoryl).

Bonus: Antioxidants

Sunscreens formulated with antioxidants can further protect against harmful UV rays and damaging free radicals.

Caffeine, silymarin (from milk thistle), genistein ( a soy isoflavone), epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG), resveratrol, and vitamin C (ascorbic acid)  are examples of common added antioxidants.

Application

According to the FDA, the correct amount of product to use is a teaspoon for the face and a shot glass for the body. Apply 30 minutes before sun exposure.  Remember, constant reapplication is key, even with sweat and water resistant sunscreens!  Also, avoiding prime sun hours (10 a.m.-4 p.m.) if you can, and covering up with shades and a hat helps.

Overall

Physical sunscreens are typically a good option for sensitive skin types and offer UVA and UVB protection.  Chemical sunscreens offer adequate protection from UVB rays but frequently don’t offer favorable protection against UVA rays. Blended sunscreens (physical and chemical) with the addition of antioxidants are ideal, however the type of sunscreen that will work best depends on your skin and how it reacts. Sometimes, it takes a couple of trial and error sessions to figure out what the best formulation is for you.

I hope you found this post helpful.

Feel free to comment or ask a question!

To Shea!

shea butter

Suffering from eczema, psoriasis or dry skin?

Here is one topical ingredient that can improve and relieve symptoms associated with these skin conditions.

Who: Butyrospermum Parkii, or shea butter

What skin types/conditions it can help: Dry, aging, eczema and psoriasis               

Where it comes from: The nut of the karite tree which grows in Africa

Why it’s important: Rich in vitamins A and E (antioxidants) and vitamin F (an Essential Fatty Acid known as linoleic acid), shea butter protects the skin from free radicals, helps minimize the appearance of lines and wrinkles, and is a great emollient.  It also has soothing and nourishing properties

How it helps with dry, aging, eczema and psoriasis: Emollients maintain soft, smooth, pliable skin; remain on skin surface to act as a lubricant; reduce flaking; and improve appearance.  The soothing and nourishing aspects help repair the skin barrier.  Linoleic acid in skin care helps provide anti-inflammatory, moisturizing and healing support.

The ‘E’ In Healthy Skin

Vitamin E

Dry and aging skin need not despair!  Vitamin E is excellent in smoothing away fine lines and wrinkles while keeping skin supple and providing a radiant glow.

Have oily skin? There is a silver lining to all that shine.

Read on to find out what vitamin E can do for you!

Who: Vitamin E

What skin conditions it can help: Aging.

Where it’s found: Foods high in vitamin E include vegetables, oils, seeds, corn, wheat germ and egg yolk.

For topical uses look for: Vitamin E, Tocopherol, Tocotrienols, Alpha-Tocopheryl Acetate, Tocopheryl Linoleate, Tocopheryl Succinate, Tocopheryl Nicotinate.

Why it’s important: Vitamin E is a fat-soluble vitamin, an antioxidant that quenches free radicals and is instrumental in wound healing.  It’s also the most abundant antioxidant found in human skin; however, it declines with exposure to UV rays, pollution and age.

How it affects the body and skin: Vitamin E is needed to prevent muscle weakness (atrophy), loss of muscle mass, abnormal eye movements, vision problems and unsteady walking.

Topical use of vitamin E smooths skin, prevents moisture loss (excellent for dry skin!), and can reach living cells, therefore increasing the effectiveness of sunscreen. Studies have shown it to reduce sunburn cells after UV exposure- but this isn’t a free pass to subject your skin to sunburns!

Vitamin E is naturally delivered to the skin’s surface through sebum (oil), providing nourishment for the skin, and could be a possible reason why oily skin types age better.  Combined use of vitamin E and vitamin C enhances these effects.

Have a favorite vitamin E product?  Do share!

Happy Tuesday!

Disclaimer: The contents on this website, and any related links, are provided for general informational purposes and should NOT be considered medical advice. The content is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Never disregard professional medical advice or delay in seeking it because of something you have read here. Please consult a healthcare provider if you have any questions about a particular health condition.

Ingredient Importan-C!

Vitamin C

Crazy weather and flu season usually sends us sprinting to our nearest pharmacy to stock up on vitamin C in hopes of strengthening our immune system.  Aside from boosting our immune system and hearing about collagen production, what else do you really know about vitamin C?  What health ailment did sailors endure because they lacked vitamin C and what role does it play in skincare?

Read on to find out!

Who: Vitamin C

What skin conditions it can help: Aging, hyperpigmentation.  Sensitive skin may tolerate it at lower percentages or as magnesium ascorbyl phosphate.

Where it’s found: Foods high in vitamin C include oranges, broccoli, strawberries, papaya, bell peppers and kiwis.

For topical uses look for: Vitamin C, Vitamin C ester, L-ascorbic acid, ascorbyl palmitate and magnesium ascorbyl phosphate.

Why it’s important:  Humans cannot synthesize vitamin C, which is why it has to be obtained by external sources (i.e. fruits and vegetables or through supplements). Vitamin C stimulates collagen synthesis which is needed for wound healing, and is also crucial for iron absorption. . It’s required for tissue growth and is a proven antioxidant, fighting free radicals that cause damage to healthy cells and DNA.

How it affects the body and skin: Oral vitamin C is needed to prevent scurvy, a disease which at one time plagued many sailors who only consumed cured and salted meats, and dried grains for extended periods of time. Scurvy has many skin manifestations including fragile skin, gum disease, easy bruising and bloody nail beds. Scurvy is reversed however, by adding vitamin C into the diet either through supplements or fresh citrus fruit.

Topical use of vitamin C results in a reduction of fine lines and wrinkles, promotes the formation of collagen- important for improved skin texture-  and protects the skin from photodamage, also known as UV damage. It can also reduce pigmentation due to its brightening properties.

Disclaimer: The contents on this website, and any related links, are provided for general informational purposes and should NOT be considered medical advice. The content is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Never disregard professional medical advice or delay in seeking it because of something you have read here. Please consult a healthcare provider if you have any questions about a particular health condition.