Skin Tip: Glow From the Inside Out!

Happy Friday everyone!

Eating foods like salmon, tuna,  walnuts, flax and pumpkin seeds  that are rich in  omega-3 can help combat dry skin from the inside out.  So, if topical treatments aren’t enough, take a look at your diet and see if you are incorporating enough Essential Fatty Acids.

Have a lovely weekend everyone!  Sephora VIB weekend is here for me and well, you know I’ll be doing some shopping. Nothing too crazy though.  😉

Stephanie 

Disclaimer:  The contents on this website, and any related links, are provided for general informational purposes and should NOT be considered medical advice. The content is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Never disregard professional medical advice or delay in seeking it because of something you have read here. Please consult a healthcare provider if you have any questions about a particular health condition.  

Skin Tip: Exercise and Your Skin!

It’s Friday and I’m back with my weekly tips!

Since I’ve upped my exercise routine the last two weeks I was reminded of how important this tip is.  Applying  a light-weight moisturizer helps prevent that uncomfortable and tight feeling on your skin since exercising makes your skin lose moisture.  And of course, if you’re exercising outside, don’t forget your sunscreen.

Have a great and safe weekend everyone! 

Stephanie 

Skin Tip: Over Exfoliating Can Lead to Sensitivity!

Happy Friday readers!

Over the weekend I had a consultation with someone who was concerned with dry and tight feeling skin. After asking her questions regarding lifestyle and product use, I learned that she was exfoliating daily with a cleanser that had tiny beads.  While exfoliating is great, moderation, like anything else is key.  Too much can cause sensitivity, inflammation and dry skin as the skin’s protective barrier  becomes impaired.  Limit use to 2-3x per week.

Quick updates: 

My laptop got some kind of weird virus so that’s getting fixed over the weekend but I apologize if I am behind on comments and commenting on your posts;it’s a bit difficult to keep up with a phone/tablet.

Next week is my UCLA class and I’ll be busy trying to get everything in order but I have a few short posts lined up.  Here’s to hoping nothing else goes wrong. 🙂

If any of you pray, please keep me in your prayers- I’d really appreciate it.  I have been sick on and off for about two months now and I feel some of the medications I’ve taken have led to other problems.  It is very frustrating when you get rid of one issue and something else pops up.  I have two doctor’s appointments Monday so I hope I can start getting this resolved.

Have a lovely weekend, 

Stephanie 

Could Your Skin Be Dehydrated Instead of Dry?

Hello readers!  🙂

We’re pretty much all familiar with the term dehydration.  Dehydration occurs when your body does not have as much water and fluids as it should but did you know that the same concept applies to your skin? If your skin has ever felt dry or taut, you may be experiencing dehydration.  It’s important to note that dehydration can occur on all skin types (yes, even oily).

The difference between dry skin and dehydrated skin is that dry skin lacks oil while dehydrated skin lacks water.  (To learn more about skin types click here)

Appearance

Dehydration can be characterized by:

  • a flaky appearance
  • feels tight and dry
  • very superficial fine lines

Causes

Skin that is dehydrated can be caused by:

  • lack of moisture
  • age
  • incorrect product use (harsh products such as soap and over-exfoliating)
  • diet (mainly fat-free diets)
  • climates (cold winds and low temperatures)
  • environment (heaters and air conditioners)
  • medications/medical conditions
  • excessive coffee and alcohol intake,
  • hormonal imbalances
  • UV exposure

Treatment 

Keep in mind all the possible causes and adjust accordingly.  (FYI: For dietary concerns ALWAYS consult a medical professional and/or registered dietitian before implementing any changes in your diet to verify there are no contraindications with certain medical conditions or medications.)

Also, maintaining a skin care routine appropriate for your skin type that includes humectants (water attracting ingredients) such as glycerin, sodium PCA, sorbitol and hyaluronic acid.

Click here for product recommendations, including those with oily skin.

I hope this information was helpful and as always if you have any questions/concerns, feel free to ask me. 🙂

Stephanie 

Disclaimer:  The contents on this website, and any related links, are provided for general informational purposes and should NOT be considered medical advice. The content is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Never disregard professional medical advice or delay in seeking it because of something you have read here. Please consult a healthcare provider if you have any questions about a particular health condition.  

 

First Look: Renee Rouleau Pro Remedy Oil!

RR

Renee and I at Sofitel in Beverly Hills

Hi readers!  I hope you all had a great weekend!

I was given the unique (and awesome!) opportunity to assist celebrity esthetician Renee Rouleau during one of her quarterly visits here in L.A. This is the second time I have helped her during her stay and words cannot express how blessed I feel to be able to participate in this event. Renee is one of the go-to skin care gurus with celebrity clients like Demi Lovato and Lisa Rina and generates rave reviews from beauty editors with good reason.  Aside from being extremely knowledgeable and formulating her own skin care line, she is also genuinely sweet, caring and humble.   When I first met her, she greeted me with a hug and smile that felt like I had known her forever.  Such a lovely person inside and out.

Pro Remedy Oil

I was one of the lucky ones that received a bottle of her soon to be released newly released Pro Remedy Oil!  Pro Remedy Oil is a blend of 12 natural oils including sweet almond oil, evening primrose oil, rosehip oil and cranberry oil that “helps repair dry skin from airplane travel, eczema, sunburn, dry climate and pregnancy.”  Since many of us receive chemical peels during the fall and winter months, this oil can also be used post-chemical peel to soothe skin.

Pro Remedy Oil is a clear light-weight, citrus scented oil that absorbs quickly into the skin.  Since I have combination skin, I mix about 2-3 drops with my moisturizer and apply to my face-a little goes a long way.  So far, I like how my skin has felt hydrated with no heavy after feel and I haven’t broken out.  We’ll see if that changes in the next couple of weeks.

If you have dry skin or eczema and haven’t found products that work, definitely look into this oil, especially during these next few months when we’re prone to losing more moisture.    Those with acne or oily skin types should tread lightly since you already produce enough oil and probably don’t need anymore.

RR 3

Other goodies I received: Bio Calm Repair Masque, Aloe Cleansing Milk and Bio Radiance Night Serum- can’t wait to try them out.

I’ve tried a couple of products from Renee’s line and although there were some I didn’t like or didn’t work for me, some items worth checking out that I love include Luxe Mint Cleansing Gel, BHA Clarifying Serum, and Triple Berry Smoothing Peel.

If you’re interested in Renee’s skin care line, visit her website www.reneerouleau.com

Hope you enjoyed this post and sneak peek! 

 

 

 

What’s Aging You?

aging

69 year-old truck driver whose left side of the face was exposed to the sun for 28 years.

 

By at least our 30’s, if not sooner, many of us start reaching for products that can help delay the aging effect.  While aging is a natural part of life, if you’re seeing signs of premature wrinkles, take a look at this fact.  85% of skin aging is caused by how you live (i.e. sun exposure, pollution, unhealthy lifestyle). 

Aging can be classified into two types: intrinsic and extrinsic.  Intrinsic aging reflects genetic background and the passage of time; in other words, elements that are beyond our control.  Extrinsic aging (considered to be preventable) is brought about by environmental or external factors, including smoking, alcohol consumption, poor nutrition, and UV exposure.

Do you know which factor is responsible for expediting the aging process?

If you guessed the sun, you are correct (and have been reading my posts)!

By now you know the danger of excessive and unprotected UV exposure (skin cancer), but it also leads to photo-aging– a term used to describe the characteristic changes of  sun induced skin.

photo-age

Extrinsic, left; Intrinsic , right.

The image above depicts photo-aged skin (left) and chronological aged skin (right).  See the dramatic difference?

Let’s take a look at how structurally these two pictures differ.

Protected From UV Damage and Extrinsic Elements

When age is caused by intrinsic forces, the skin has a thinned, smooth, clear, almost transparent apperance.  There is also fine wrinkling, inelastic, saggy skin, increased dryness, slight flakiness, loss of underlying fat resulting in hollow cheeks and eye socket and a slowing of collagen and elastin production

Exposed To UV Damage and Other Extrinsic Elements 

Aging caused by this will culminate in a thickened epidermis resulting in rough, leathery skin, telangiectasia (dilated blood vessels), yellow, sallow coloration and age spots.  There is an increased risk of skin cancer and a degradation of collagen and elastin.

As you can see, how you will age is contingent on several factors, most of which are preventable.  Sunscreen is and will continue to be one of the most powerful products in your skin care arsenal.  The best news, it’s also the most cost effective!

 

 

 

 

 

Can Fat Help Dry Skin?

EFAs

The dreaded F-word: fat.

Although many think fat-free is the way to go, if you find that not even topical ingredients help your dry skin, take a look at your diet.  While fats are given a negative connotation, they are a crucial component of good health as it helps your body retain heat, lubricates the skin and assists in absorption of fat-soluble vitamins A, D, E and K.

Not All Fats Are Created Equal

So does this mean you can overly indulge in french fries?  Wishful thinking, but no.  Fried foods don’t make the cut. However, the benefits you’ll reap from the good fats just may outweigh this notion and allow for the occasional treat.

Enter essential fatty acids (EFAs). EFAs are acids the body can’t manufacture on its own and therefore need to be obtained through our diet.  EFAs are necessary for brain and body development, metabolism, and hair and skin growth.   At a cellular level, EFAs are important because cell membranes hold water in, and the stronger they are, the better your skin cells can retain that moisture.  A deficiency in EFAs can result in dermatitis (eczema), reduced barrier function, scaly skin and increased moisture loss.

 EFA Types: Omega-3 and Omega-6.

Linoleic acid is an omega-6 that is used to make important hormones and maintains the lipid barrier of the skin.  Linoleic acid is found in oils made from safflower, grapeseed, sunflower, corn, soybean, borage and flaxseed but is also found in raw nuts, seeds and legumes. *It’s important to note that high amounts of omega-6 can promote inflammation, so low amounts are key.  The typical American diet has an excess of omega-6.

Alpha-linolenic acid is an omega-3 that is a popular nutrient for healthy skin and reduces inflammation.  The Mediterranean diet is high in omega-3.  Sources of omega-3 rich foods include salmon, mackerel, tuna, herring, trout, cod, fish oil, walnuts, flax, pumpkin seeds and algae.

Dry skin, for the most part can be reversed with topical and ingested supplementation.  However, ALWAYS consult a medical professional and/or registered dietitian before implementing any changes in your diet to verify there are no contraindications with certain medical conditions or medications.

Do you notice a difference in your skin with certain foods you eat or don’t eat? Do share! 

Disclaimer:  The contents on this website, and any related links, are provided for general informational purposes and should NOT be considered medical advice. The content is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Never disregard professional medical advice or delay in seeking it because of something you have read here. Please consult a healthcare provider if you have any questions about a particular health condition.  

What’s Your Type?

Our skin types are genetically determined.  However, to the joy of some and the dismay of others, they can change over time, or you can have a combination of several all at once.  Dry skin and a few breakouts here and there?  Yup.  As weird as it sounds, it can happen.

Do you know your skin type(s) or do you just recall what someone once told you your skin type was and have clung to that notion ever since?

Here are six common skin types and their characteristics to help you determine-or at least give you an idea of- of what would be beneficial to your skin.

normal skin

Normal

Normal skin (oh the lucky ones!) has a good oil-water balance and is soft and plump.  It has a healthy glow and color, with fine texture, small pores and no congestion .  Maintenance and preventative care are your main goals.

combination skin

Combination

I personally fall into this category and let me tell you, it can be gosh darn frustrating.  Combination skin is characterized by an oily T-zone (forehead, nose, and chin) while the cheeks tend to be on the dry side, causing a flaky appearance.  The goal is to control areas prone to oiliness while moisturizing areas that are dry, and to keep skin well exfoliated to help combat breakouts and dryness.

oily skin

Oily

Oily skin is characterized by an all over greasy shine, visible pores, coarser skin texture (akin to that of  an orange), little wrinkling (silver lining, no?), blackheads/whiteheads, breakouts.  Controlling sebum production, and clearing out the pores is key.  Ingredients like hyaluronic acid and glycerin are good at providing hydration.

acne

Acne

Not just for teenagers anymore as the number of adult acne is rising.  Symptoms range from blackheads/whiteheads, breakouts, painful cysts, inflammation and sensitivity .  Causes of acne can be genetic or a hormonal imbalance.  Deep cleansing facials, proper home regimen and soothing the skin are goals. Avoid excessive or harsh cleansers as it can make acne worse.

dry skin

Dry

If the Sahara desert would be envious, then you probably have dry skin.  Where oily skin produces a mass amount of oil, dry skin doesn’t produce enough. Visible dryness, small pores, tightness,and a propensity to wrinkles are indicators of dry skin.   Cleansing creams or milky cleansers are ideal as they don’t strip the skin while ingredients like shea butter or borage seed oil are great moisturizers.

sensitive

Sensitive

Sensitive skin is identified by fragile, thin, red skin that has an impaired barrier function and more reactive capillaries. It’s easily irritated by products (even sometime water) and exposure to heat and sun.  Avoid excessive rubbing, heat, exfoliation, or extractions.  Use calming, soothing ingredients like aloe vera, panthenol (pro-vitamin B-5), bisabolol, and niacinamide.

Has your skin type been consistent or has it undergone major changes throughout the years? 

 

 

 

 

Why Squeaky Clean Can Be Mean

soap

At some point, whether it be morning, mid-afternoon, or evening- perhaps even all three- we walk ourselves over to the sink or shower to cleanse our face.  The accumulation of sebum, dirt and environmental pollution can leave our skin feeling grimy and we think that tight, squeaky clean feeling after cleansing means we have gotten rid of it all.  Often, the choice of said cleansing is soap, and well, why not? It’s convenient, fairly inexpensive, and if it’s tough enough to remove oil and dirt from our body, hey, why not extend its use to our face, right?

Wrong!

Aside from removing debris and oil, soap tends to remove the fats between the skin cells known as intercellular lipids. Our skin has what’s know as an internal cellular matrix,which is the lipid (fat) substance between cells that protect the cells from water loss and irritation.  Excessive removal of these lipids results in dry skin and skin disease.

Take a quick trip back to your chemistry class by glancing at pH (potential hydrogen) scale below.

 

pH scale

 

The pH scale measures the acidity or alkalinity of any substance that contains water and extends from 0 to 14, with 7 being neutral.  Anything below 7 is considered acidic and anything above 7 is alkaline. Soap also has a high pH level, 9-11, while the natural pH of skin can range from 4-6.  Since sebum and sweat create a barrier on the skin’s surface known as the acid mantle, this protects against certain forms of bacteria and other microorganisms.  Extreme variations in pH can damage the skin’s barrier functions and cause sensitivity, aging, dehydration, and can worsen skin conditions like eczema and psoriasis.  Also, highly alkaline solutions can form an insoluble film, leaving skin feeling dry, irritated and itchy.

Considering the information above and knowing the skin on our face is a lot more delicate than the skin on our body, using facial cleansers that are soap-free or pH balanced are best.

I hope this post was helpful in explaining why using soap to cleanse the face isn’t an ideal option.

Have a great Tuesday!

 

 

 

 

 

Is Exercise Wreaking Havoc on Your Skin?

exercise

The advantages of exercise are numerous.  It increases endorphins, elevates your mood, decreases your risk for disease, controls your weight, focuses your mind, reduces stress, and keeps you healthy and strong.

Beauty bonus: As your heart rate increase, it sends oxygen to your skin and creates a healthy glow.

Pretty great benefits if you ask me.  But what happens when you start developing a host of other issues? Dry skin. Sudden breakouts. The dreaded bacne.  Not really what you signed up for, is it?

Instead of throwing in the towel, a few adjustments to your skincare routine can make a huge difference.

Here are some guidelines and factors to keep in mind before and after your workout.

Wear sunscreen!  Use a broad spectrum SPF of at least 30 and reapply frequently when sweating or swimming, especially when outdoors.

Exercising makes your skin lose moisture so wear a light-weight moisturizer.

If possible, immediately wash your face and body after working out.  Alcohol-free towelettes or makeup remover wipes can work to remove sweat and dirt if you can’t wash your face.

If your skin feels dry after cleansing (meaning no oil), try switching to a cream based cleanser.  Adding a hydrating mask 2-3 times per week can help.

 Combination/ Oily skin can use a gel or foam wash. If you are prone to breakouts, choose a cleanser with acne fighting ingredients- tea tree, sulfur, benzoyl peroxide, salicylic acid, and/ or papain (papaya enzymes) are a few ingredients to look for. Using a clay based mask up to 3 times per week can help control sebum and draw out impurities.

Tight-fighting workout clothes sweat and friction can lead to breakouts on your body, especially your back.  Adding breathable, moisture-wicking fabrics and showering right after you workout can help.  If you’re prone to breakouts on your back, use a salicylic acid body wash, gently exfoliate with a scrub, and spot treat.

Excessive sweating and heat can cause flare ups if you have eczema– something to keep in mind.

I hope this post was helpful!

Feel free to leave a question or comment.