First Look: Renee Rouleau Pro Remedy Oil!

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Renee and I at Sofitel in Beverly Hills

Hi readers!  I hope you all had a great weekend!

I was given the unique (and awesome!) opportunity to assist celebrity esthetician Renee Rouleau during one of her quarterly visits here in L.A. This is the second time I have helped her during her stay and words cannot express how blessed I feel to be able to participate in this event. Renee is one of the go-to skin care gurus with celebrity clients like Demi Lovato and Lisa Rina and generates rave reviews from beauty editors with good reason.  Aside from being extremely knowledgeable and formulating her own skin care line, she is also genuinely sweet, caring and humble.   When I first met her, she greeted me with a hug and smile that felt like I had known her forever.  Such a lovely person inside and out.

Pro Remedy Oil

I was one of the lucky ones that received a bottle of her soon to be released newly released Pro Remedy Oil!  Pro Remedy Oil is a blend of 12 natural oils including sweet almond oil, evening primrose oil, rosehip oil and cranberry oil that “helps repair dry skin from airplane travel, eczema, sunburn, dry climate and pregnancy.”  Since many of us receive chemical peels during the fall and winter months, this oil can also be used post-chemical peel to soothe skin.

Pro Remedy Oil is a clear light-weight, citrus scented oil that absorbs quickly into the skin.  Since I have combination skin, I mix about 2-3 drops with my moisturizer and apply to my face-a little goes a long way.  So far, I like how my skin has felt hydrated with no heavy after feel and I haven’t broken out.  We’ll see if that changes in the next couple of weeks.

If you have dry skin or eczema and haven’t found products that work, definitely look into this oil, especially during these next few months when we’re prone to losing more moisture.    Those with acne or oily skin types should tread lightly since you already produce enough oil and probably don’t need anymore.

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Other goodies I received: Bio Calm Repair Masque, Aloe Cleansing Milk and Bio Radiance Night Serum- can’t wait to try them out.

I’ve tried a couple of products from Renee’s line and although there were some I didn’t like or didn’t work for me, some items worth checking out that I love include Luxe Mint Cleansing Gel, BHA Clarifying Serum, and Triple Berry Smoothing Peel.

If you’re interested in Renee’s skin care line, visit her website www.reneerouleau.com

Hope you enjoyed this post and sneak peek! 

 

 

 

Can Fat Help Dry Skin?

EFAs

The dreaded F-word: fat.

Although many think fat-free is the way to go, if you find that not even topical ingredients help your dry skin, take a look at your diet.  While fats are given a negative connotation, they are a crucial component of good health as it helps your body retain heat, lubricates the skin and assists in absorption of fat-soluble vitamins A, D, E and K.

Not All Fats Are Created Equal

So does this mean you can overly indulge in french fries?  Wishful thinking, but no.  Fried foods don’t make the cut. However, the benefits you’ll reap from the good fats just may outweigh this notion and allow for the occasional treat.

Enter essential fatty acids (EFAs). EFAs are acids the body can’t manufacture on its own and therefore need to be obtained through our diet.  EFAs are necessary for brain and body development, metabolism, and hair and skin growth.   At a cellular level, EFAs are important because cell membranes hold water in, and the stronger they are, the better your skin cells can retain that moisture.  A deficiency in EFAs can result in dermatitis (eczema), reduced barrier function, scaly skin and increased moisture loss.

 EFA Types: Omega-3 and Omega-6.

Linoleic acid is an omega-6 that is used to make important hormones and maintains the lipid barrier of the skin.  Linoleic acid is found in oils made from safflower, grapeseed, sunflower, corn, soybean, borage and flaxseed but is also found in raw nuts, seeds and legumes. *It’s important to note that high amounts of omega-6 can promote inflammation, so low amounts are key.  The typical American diet has an excess of omega-6.

Alpha-linolenic acid is an omega-3 that is a popular nutrient for healthy skin and reduces inflammation.  The Mediterranean diet is high in omega-3.  Sources of omega-3 rich foods include salmon, mackerel, tuna, herring, trout, cod, fish oil, walnuts, flax, pumpkin seeds and algae.

Dry skin, for the most part can be reversed with topical and ingested supplementation.  However, ALWAYS consult a medical professional and/or registered dietitian before implementing any changes in your diet to verify there are no contraindications with certain medical conditions or medications.

Do you notice a difference in your skin with certain foods you eat or don’t eat? Do share! 

Disclaimer:  The contents on this website, and any related links, are provided for general informational purposes and should NOT be considered medical advice. The content is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Never disregard professional medical advice or delay in seeking it because of something you have read here. Please consult a healthcare provider if you have any questions about a particular health condition.  

Why Squeaky Clean Can Be Mean

soap

At some point, whether it be morning, mid-afternoon, or evening- perhaps even all three- we walk ourselves over to the sink or shower to cleanse our face.  The accumulation of sebum, dirt and environmental pollution can leave our skin feeling grimy and we think that tight, squeaky clean feeling after cleansing means we have gotten rid of it all.  Often, the choice of said cleansing is soap, and well, why not? It’s convenient, fairly inexpensive, and if it’s tough enough to remove oil and dirt from our body, hey, why not extend its use to our face, right?

Wrong!

Aside from removing debris and oil, soap tends to remove the fats between the skin cells known as intercellular lipids. Our skin has what’s know as an internal cellular matrix,which is the lipid (fat) substance between cells that protect the cells from water loss and irritation.  Excessive removal of these lipids results in dry skin and skin disease.

Take a quick trip back to your chemistry class by glancing at pH (potential hydrogen) scale below.

 

pH scale

 

The pH scale measures the acidity or alkalinity of any substance that contains water and extends from 0 to 14, with 7 being neutral.  Anything below 7 is considered acidic and anything above 7 is alkaline. Soap also has a high pH level, 9-11, while the natural pH of skin can range from 4-6.  Since sebum and sweat create a barrier on the skin’s surface known as the acid mantle, this protects against certain forms of bacteria and other microorganisms.  Extreme variations in pH can damage the skin’s barrier functions and cause sensitivity, aging, dehydration, and can worsen skin conditions like eczema and psoriasis.  Also, highly alkaline solutions can form an insoluble film, leaving skin feeling dry, irritated and itchy.

Considering the information above and knowing the skin on our face is a lot more delicate than the skin on our body, using facial cleansers that are soap-free or pH balanced are best.

I hope this post was helpful in explaining why using soap to cleanse the face isn’t an ideal option.

Have a great Tuesday!

 

 

 

 

 

Is Exercise Wreaking Havoc on Your Skin?

exercise

The advantages of exercise are numerous.  It increases endorphins, elevates your mood, decreases your risk for disease, controls your weight, focuses your mind, reduces stress, and keeps you healthy and strong.

Beauty bonus: As your heart rate increase, it sends oxygen to your skin and creates a healthy glow.

Pretty great benefits if you ask me.  But what happens when you start developing a host of other issues? Dry skin. Sudden breakouts. The dreaded bacne.  Not really what you signed up for, is it?

Instead of throwing in the towel, a few adjustments to your skincare routine can make a huge difference.

Here are some guidelines and factors to keep in mind before and after your workout.

Wear sunscreen!  Use a broad spectrum SPF of at least 30 and reapply frequently when sweating or swimming, especially when outdoors.

Exercising makes your skin lose moisture so wear a light-weight moisturizer.

If possible, immediately wash your face and body after working out.  Alcohol-free towelettes or makeup remover wipes can work to remove sweat and dirt if you can’t wash your face.

If your skin feels dry after cleansing (meaning no oil), try switching to a cream based cleanser.  Adding a hydrating mask 2-3 times per week can help.

 Combination/ Oily skin can use a gel or foam wash. If you are prone to breakouts, choose a cleanser with acne fighting ingredients- tea tree, sulfur, benzoyl peroxide, salicylic acid, and/ or papain (papaya enzymes) are a few ingredients to look for. Using a clay based mask up to 3 times per week can help control sebum and draw out impurities.

Tight-fighting workout clothes sweat and friction can lead to breakouts on your body, especially your back.  Adding breathable, moisture-wicking fabrics and showering right after you workout can help.  If you’re prone to breakouts on your back, use a salicylic acid body wash, gently exfoliate with a scrub, and spot treat.

Excessive sweating and heat can cause flare ups if you have eczema– something to keep in mind.

I hope this post was helpful!

Feel free to leave a question or comment.

To Shea!

shea butter

Suffering from eczema, psoriasis or dry skin?

Here is one topical ingredient that can improve and relieve symptoms associated with these skin conditions.

Who: Butyrospermum Parkii, or shea butter

What skin types/conditions it can help: Dry, aging, eczema and psoriasis               

Where it comes from: The nut of the karite tree which grows in Africa

Why it’s important: Rich in vitamins A and E (antioxidants) and vitamin F (an Essential Fatty Acid known as linoleic acid), shea butter protects the skin from free radicals, helps minimize the appearance of lines and wrinkles, and is a great emollient.  It also has soothing and nourishing properties

How it helps with dry, aging, eczema and psoriasis: Emollients maintain soft, smooth, pliable skin; remain on skin surface to act as a lubricant; reduce flaking; and improve appearance.  The soothing and nourishing aspects help repair the skin barrier.  Linoleic acid in skin care helps provide anti-inflammatory, moisturizing and healing support.