Pumpkin: Skin Treat or Trick?

pumpkin

With the commence of fall in full gear and Halloween coming closer, pretty much everywhere we turn we are inundated with the sight of pumpkins and alluring scents of pumpkins laced with cinnamon and clove.  Similarly, around this time, spas often start to offer pumpkin peels.   Although yummy in pies and lattes, what makes pumpkins in skincare so special?

Enzymes!

Pumpkins contain enzymes that “eat” old, dry skin cells-think of them like a Pac-Man- revealing healthy, glowing skin. Pumpkins are rich in antioxidants vitamin C and notably vitamin A- the anti-aging superstar that minimizes fine lines and wrinkles. Pumpkins are also high in beta carotene, infusing skin with vital nutrients, and zinc which purportedly reduces the appearance of inflammation associated with breakouts.

A few brands that include pumpkin in their products are Eminence, Ayurmedic, June Jacobs and Murad.

Pumpkin Peels 

Most skincare facilities offer pumpkin peels which are often formulated with glycolic, lactic and/or salicylic acid that provide the following benefits:

  • Improves skin texture
  • Targets hyper-pigmentation and acne
  • Stimulates collagen and elastin production.
  • Helps with the cell renewal process.
  • Reduces signs of aging by softening fine lines and wrinkles
  • Hydrates the skin

Pumpkin peels are a great way to refresh your complexion right before the holidays not to mention they smell amazing!

Love pumpkin peels or have a favorite pumpkin product?  Do share your experience!  

Stephanie

What the Milia?

milia

If you’ve ever examined your skin and noticed tiny, white hard bumps that resemble sesame seeds, most likely you have a skin anomaly known as milia.  No need to panic though. Milia aren’t harmful, they’re just more of a complexion nuisance, and boy, are they stubborn!

Milia are usually found around the eyes, cheeks, and forehead and occur when oil, debris and dead skin cells become trapped beneath the surface of the skin.  Although they resemble whiteheads, milia won’t go away easily because they don’t have an escape route, meaning they’re not in the pores but rather ‘stuck’ under the outer layer of your skin. Therefore, trying to extract them yourself is NOT recommended since you can damage surrounding tissue and cause scarring.

So what options are available?

First, let’s examine the common culprits. Milia can be genetic and can also be caused by using too-rich ingredients such as mineral oil, lanolin, and isopropyl myristate.  If milia are prevalent around the eye area, make sure your eye cream and/or makeup remover is free from these ingredients.

Now, on to the treatment.  Thoroughly cleansing your face at night (read: more than just splashing your face with water) can help keep them from forming.  Mild exfoliation (enzymes are great for this!) and using a serum or cream with either hydroxy acids (lactic, glycolic, or salicylic) or retinol can also help.  If this solution doesn’t work (and frustratingly, it often doesn’t) or you want faster results, visit a dermatologist or esthetician where they can remove milia with a lancet.

Do you have milia? What treatment worked best for you?