Skin Tip: Fatty Alcohols!

It’s Friday which means my weekly skin tip!

Stearyl alcohol and cetearyl alcohol are known as fatty alcohols that can function as humectants, drawing water to the skin, providing a soft and smooth appearance in the skin.

Thanks so much for reading and please tune in everyday next week starting Monday as I will have a special post up.

Have a good weekend,

Stephanie

 

Could Your Skin Be Dehydrated Instead of Dry?

Hello readers! ¬†ūüôā

We’re pretty much all familiar with the term dehydration. ¬†Dehydration occurs when¬†your body does not have as much water and fluids as it should but did you know that the same concept applies to your skin? If your skin has ever felt dry or taut, you may be¬†experiencing dehydration. ¬†It’s important to note that dehydration can occur on all skin types (yes, even oily).

The difference between dry skin and dehydrated skin is that dry skin lacks oil while dehydrated skin lacks water.  (To learn more about skin types click here)

Appearance

Dehydration can be characterized by:

  • a flaky appearance
  • feels tight and dry
  • very superficial fine lines

Causes

Skin that is dehydrated can be caused by:

  • lack of moisture
  • age
  • incorrect product use (harsh products such as soap and over-exfoliating)
  • diet (mainly fat-free diets)
  • climates (cold winds and low temperatures)
  • environment (heaters and air conditioners)
  • medications/medical conditions
  • excessive coffee and alcohol intake,
  • hormonal imbalances
  • UV exposure

Treatment 

Keep in mind all the possible causes and adjust accordingly.  (FYI: For dietary concerns ALWAYS consult a medical professional and/or registered dietitian before implementing any changes in your diet to verify there are no contraindications with certain medical conditions or medications.)

Also, maintaining a skin care routine appropriate for your skin type that includes humectants (water attracting ingredients) such as glycerin, sodium PCA, sorbitol and hyaluronic acid.

Click here for product recommendations, including those with oily skin.

I hope this information was helpful and as always if you have any questions/concerns, feel free to ask me. ūüôā

Stephanie 

Disclaimer:  The contents on this website, and any related links, are provided for general informational purposes and should NOT be considered medical advice. The content is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Never disregard professional medical advice or delay in seeking it because of something you have read here. Please consult a healthcare provider if you have any questions about a particular health condition.  

 

Shine On…Just Maybe Not Too Much

oil

Oh, oil.

You can be a dry skin type’s best friend by creating an ethereal glow and an oily skin type’s worst enemy causing us to look like one hot mess.  While oil is a natural substance found in our skin that helps keep skin supple, too much of it can cause problems such as acne and blackheads.

Aside from genetics, there are other factors that can contribute to less than a desirable amount of oil production.

Causes

Genetics, of course

Yup, you can thank your ancestry for this one as skin types are determined by your genes.  There is a chance however, that your skin type may change with age.

Hormones/Stress

There is a reason why the majority of breakouts occur when you are a teenager.  Your sebaceous glands (glands that are charge of producing oil) are typically dormant before puberty, and spring into life after puberty. Hormones at this time are also raging out of control.  The adrenal glands produce testosterone in women, thereby increasing sebum production.

Continual chronic stress also increases hormone levels and also increased sebum levels.

Environment

Heat and humidity increase oil levels.  Individuals who work in kitchens or laundry mats or who live in hot and humid places can often find an increase in oil.

Harsh products/Not using a moisturizer  

Excessive drying of skin or not moisturizing the skin may cause the sebaceous glands to overcompensate by producing an excessive amount of sebum to replace the moisture lost.

Solutions 

Although you can’t really reason with genetics, figure out what your triggers are and read these options available to help keep sebum at bay.

Relax and slow down¬†if stress seems to be the issue. ¬†Take a small amount of time out of your day/night (even if it’s only one minute!) for yourself and do something you enjoy. Exercising, reading, meditating, and aromatherapy can work wonders.

Hydrate!  Humectants, which include glycerin, sorbitol, hyaluronic acid and sodium PCA, attract water (not oil) to the skin and cinnamon bark, borage seed oil, wheat germ oil, niacinamide, zinc glucanate, caffeine, enantia bark, yeast extract, horse chestnut and biotin can regulate oil production with regular use.

Stay balanced! Using a pH balanced cleanser, something that is NOT soap, can help keep you from over drying the skin. Cleansing your skin about twice a say should suffice, or you run the risk of over drying the skin as well. Those who have acne may want to be careful about over using ingredients such as benzoyl peroxide, which although can be great for acne, can also be very drying.

Nutrition  Zinc can help regulate oil glands.  Zinc rich foods include oysters, crab, liver, mushrooms and spinach.

Other Blotting tissues, using oil-free makeup, and certain primers can also keep shine to a minimum.

If you have oily skin, what product do you swear by?