Reader Question: What Causes Dark Circles?

 

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Hello everyone! Hoping everyone had a great Easter weekend!

I’ve been asked about what I recommend for dark circles before and more recently Katie from Plus+Beauty also mentioned this concern (hi Katie!).

Q: What’s good for dark circles under the eyes?

A:

Dark circles can be caused by:

  • Sun damage
  • Veins and/ or capillaries showing through the skin
  •  Allergies
  •  Genetics

What to Use/Do

  • Products with retinol or vitamin C can help brighten the area.
  • An eye cream with SPF and sunglasses can help prevent more darkening if it’s caused by the sun.
  • Talking to your doctor if allergies are the culprit to see what options are available
  •  A peach colored concealer can help neutralize the appearance of dark circles
  •  Sometimes fillers like Radiesse or light treatments can help.

Product Recommendations

  • Kate Somerville Line Release Under Eye Repair
  • Algenist Firming and Lifting Eye Gel
  • Dermaologica Total Eye Care SPF 15
  • Le Miuex Eye Wrinkle Corrector
  • Renee Rouleau Vitamin C Eye Brightener
  • Eve Pearl Dual Salmon Concealer

These are a few products I have tried and liked but if you have another eye cream that works, please share!

Have a lovely Tuesday!

Stephanie

What the Milia?

milia

If you’ve ever examined your skin and noticed tiny, white hard bumps that resemble sesame seeds, most likely you have a skin anomaly known as milia.  No need to panic though. Milia aren’t harmful, they’re just more of a complexion nuisance, and boy, are they stubborn!

Milia are usually found around the eyes, cheeks, and forehead and occur when oil, debris and dead skin cells become trapped beneath the surface of the skin.  Although they resemble whiteheads, milia won’t go away easily because they don’t have an escape route, meaning they’re not in the pores but rather ‘stuck’ under the outer layer of your skin. Therefore, trying to extract them yourself is NOT recommended since you can damage surrounding tissue and cause scarring.

So what options are available?

First, let’s examine the common culprits. Milia can be genetic and can also be caused by using too-rich ingredients such as mineral oil, lanolin, and isopropyl myristate.  If milia are prevalent around the eye area, make sure your eye cream and/or makeup remover is free from these ingredients.

Now, on to the treatment.  Thoroughly cleansing your face at night (read: more than just splashing your face with water) can help keep them from forming.  Mild exfoliation (enzymes are great for this!) and using a serum or cream with either hydroxy acids (lactic, glycolic, or salicylic) or retinol can also help.  If this solution doesn’t work (and frustratingly, it often doesn’t) or you want faster results, visit a dermatologist or esthetician where they can remove milia with a lancet.

Do you have milia? What treatment worked best for you?