Skin Tip: Adding Hydration to Oily Skin!

When you have oily skin that’s feeling a little bit dry and tight, switching to a heavier moisturizer results in hydration but at the same time can also make you breakout.  Mixing a few drops of a  hydrating serum formulated with hyaluronic acid into your moisturizer increases your skin’s water content (something all skin types can benefit from), adding moisture without the heaviness of an oil.

My favorite to use is Dermalogica Skin Hydrating Booster but brands like Kate Somerville, PCA Skin, Renee Rouleau and Dr. Dennis Gross carry similar products.

Thanks for tuning in and I’ll see you next week,

Stephanie 

Reader Question: Is It Good To Let Skin Breathe?

Q: There are days I like to let my skin breathe so I don’t apply anything on my face. Is this bad?

A: Great question! First of all, skin doesn’t ‘breathe’. It can absorb topical ingredients but it can’t breathe. If there are days you don’t feel like wearing makeup, don’t. I do this from time to time. However, it’s important to at least put on moisturizer and sunscreen every day. SPF protects from the sun’s harmful UV rays and also helps protect from skin cancer. Also, every skin type benefits from a moisturizer because throughout the day and night we tend to lose moisture and even if you hydrate your body from the inside by drinking water, our skin only receives a tiny portion; this is where topical products are beneficial. If, however, you find yourself wanting to let your skin ‘breathe’ because certain products/makeup clogs your pores, you may be using the wrong ingredients for your skin type. Look for products that are non-comedogenic if you have oily or acne prone skin.

Hope this answers your question and if you are interested in how your skin functions, check out this post I wrote 🙂

https://stephieestie.wordpress.com/2014/04/17/what-your-skin-does-for-you/

Thanks for the question and don’t forget to submit one here if you have one! 🙂

What’s Your Type?

Our skin types are genetically determined.  However, to the joy of some and the dismay of others, they can change over time, or you can have a combination of several all at once.  Dry skin and a few breakouts here and there?  Yup.  As weird as it sounds, it can happen.

Do you know your skin type(s) or do you just recall what someone once told you your skin type was and have clung to that notion ever since?

Here are six common skin types and their characteristics to help you determine-or at least give you an idea of- of what would be beneficial to your skin.

normal skin

Normal

Normal skin (oh the lucky ones!) has a good oil-water balance and is soft and plump.  It has a healthy glow and color, with fine texture, small pores and no congestion .  Maintenance and preventative care are your main goals.

combination skin

Combination

I personally fall into this category and let me tell you, it can be gosh darn frustrating.  Combination skin is characterized by an oily T-zone (forehead, nose, and chin) while the cheeks tend to be on the dry side, causing a flaky appearance.  The goal is to control areas prone to oiliness while moisturizing areas that are dry, and to keep skin well exfoliated to help combat breakouts and dryness.

oily skin

Oily

Oily skin is characterized by an all over greasy shine, visible pores, coarser skin texture (akin to that of  an orange), little wrinkling (silver lining, no?), blackheads/whiteheads, breakouts.  Controlling sebum production, and clearing out the pores is key.  Ingredients like hyaluronic acid and glycerin are good at providing hydration.

acne

Acne

Not just for teenagers anymore as the number of adult acne is rising.  Symptoms range from blackheads/whiteheads, breakouts, painful cysts, inflammation and sensitivity .  Causes of acne can be genetic or a hormonal imbalance.  Deep cleansing facials, proper home regimen and soothing the skin are goals. Avoid excessive or harsh cleansers as it can make acne worse.

dry skin

Dry

If the Sahara desert would be envious, then you probably have dry skin.  Where oily skin produces a mass amount of oil, dry skin doesn’t produce enough. Visible dryness, small pores, tightness,and a propensity to wrinkles are indicators of dry skin.   Cleansing creams or milky cleansers are ideal as they don’t strip the skin while ingredients like shea butter or borage seed oil are great moisturizers.

sensitive

Sensitive

Sensitive skin is identified by fragile, thin, red skin that has an impaired barrier function and more reactive capillaries. It’s easily irritated by products (even sometime water) and exposure to heat and sun.  Avoid excessive rubbing, heat, exfoliation, or extractions.  Use calming, soothing ingredients like aloe vera, panthenol (pro-vitamin B-5), bisabolol, and niacinamide.

Has your skin type been consistent or has it undergone major changes throughout the years? 

 

 

 

 

Special Event Makeup Tips!

Makeup SE

Any special occasion- be it prom, a performance or dinner party- can send you into a frenzy to find the right dress, shoes and hairstyles.  Makeup is usually the last item on the checklist but in my opinion, it’s the most fun and helps pull the look together.  While many hire a professional makeup artist to achieve their coveted look, if you opt for the DIY route, here are some tips to help you look your best so you can be less worried about touch-ups and more focused on the event.

Skin care

Having a good skincare regimen in place facilitates your makeup application.  Cleansing, toning, moisturizing, and exfoliating are basic steps that can help you achieve a fresh, youthful look.  Proper exfoliation can also minimize the appearance of pores and ensures makeup does not cling on to dry, flaky patches.

*Note: While facials and microdermabrassion are excellent in enhancing your complexion, always schedule your appointment at least a week before your event to avoid an unwanted surprise.

Face

Liquid foundation is a popular choice as it’s easy to apply, and can benefit all skin types.  However, mineral makeup works especially well for those who have acne and cream foundation doesn’t melt as fast so it lasts longer.

Using a primer underneath your foundation and then setting your foundation with loose translucent powder makes it last longer and can keep oil in check.

Concealer

You can spot correct imperfections with concealer.  A concealer with a yellow undertone is great for counteracting the redness found on blemishes and scars while a concealer with a peach undertone is a good option for dark under eye circles.

Concealer can also be used as an ‘eraser’ to fix any mistakes- think eyeliner and lip color.

Brows

Use a brow powder on your eyebrows, and fill in only sparse areas to get a natural but defined look.

Eyes

Whether you are going for a natural or smoky look, using an eye primer helps eye makeup from creasing and can even enhance the eyeshadow color(s).  My personal favorite is Too Faced Shadow Insurance.

Water-proof eyeliner is a must to keep your eye makeup from smearing. My current liquid eyeliner obsession is Stila All Day Waterproof Liquid Eyeliner.

Lashes

False eyelashes (falsies) are always a fun way to give that extra pop.  If possible, try out a pair of eyelashes a few days before the event to rule out the possibility of having a reaction to the adhesive (glue).

If you don’t have false eyelashes or can’t wear them, a few coats of waterproof mascara should do the trick.

Cheeks

Powder blush flatters most skin types (except dry) and lasts longer. Dry skin can use a crème blush.

Lips

For long-wearing lip color without the fuss, lip stains are the way to go.

 

Most important, have fun with your look and embrace your unique beauty! 

 

 

A Day at IDI!

IDI 1

During my free time, I love learning more about the skincare industry, whether it’s through reading articles or attending advanced education classes.  Yesterday, I spent my day at the International Dermal Institute (IDI) which serves as a post-graduate education center for licensed estheticians to expand their knowledge in this constant evolving industry.  IDI is also where the ingredient research and product development of the Dermalogica skin care line happens.

I absolutely love spending time here! The staff and instructors are very helpful and knowledgeable, and highly respected industry professionals like Dr. Diana Howard and Annet King can be seen giving speeches or sitting in on some classes.  This time I took Skin Analysis 101 which covered what comprises an effective skin analysis, the importance of consultation cards (imperative whenever you get treatments!), a brief overview on understanding how the skin works, skin types vs skin conditions and skin disorders.  After the theory portion concluded came the fun part: hands on!

We all got to analyze each other’s skin using a magnifying lamp, a Woods lamp, and a skin scanner.

The magnifying lamp magnifies the face to help the esthetician treat and analyze the skin.

Mag Lamp

The Wood’s lamp is a hand-held device that uses filtered black light to illuminate skin problems, fungi, bacterial disorders and pigmentation issues.

Wood's Lamp

The skin scanner is like a Wood’s lamp in that it utilizes advanced black-light technology to help identify various skin conditions in vivid florescent colors; however, this machine is a lot bigger and both the esthetician and the client can see how their skin appears under the black light.  There’s something pretty cool (and scary!) about seeing your skin in an up close way that is not ordinarily visible to the naked eye.

Skin Scanner

Once we finished analyzing each other’s skin, we did a quick recap of what we learned and were given our certificates of completion.  I earned 6 class hours for today’s class, giving me an overall total of 33 hours at IDI!  I am 67 hours away from completing 100 hours and earning an IDI Certificate of Achievement.

IDI 2

What’s your favorite thing to do when you have free time?